Tuesday Tip: Repair Charges & Normal Wear-&-Tear


Posted On: October 27, 2020

Residents often call Navigate, wondering why management withheld the tenant’s security deposit. This week, Corporate Trainer Vickie Bell discusses the difference between ordinary wear-&-tear due to aging and tenant damage due to neglect. This video is full of examples. You may find the information helpful when submitting a Special Claim.

Appendix 5C from HUD

EXAMPLES (Not all inclusive) of TENANT DAMAGE versus “NORMAL WEAR AND TEAR”

Normal costs of turning over an apartment after a tenant vacates may not be included on a claim to HUD for tenant damages. The costs an owner incurs for the basic cleaning and repairing of such items necessary to make a unit ready for occupancy by the next tenant are part of the costs of doing business. The following is a list of items typically attributable to routine use or “normal wear and tear”.

Normal Wear and Tear

  • Fading, peeling, or cracked paint
  • Slightly torn or faded wallpaper
  • Small chips in plaster
  • Nail holes, pin holes, or cracks in wall
  • Door sticking from humidity
  • Cracked window pane from faulty foundation or building settling
  • Floors needing coat of varnish
  • Carpet faded or worn thin from walking
  • Loose grouting and bathroom tiles
  • Worn or scratched enamel in old bathtubs, sinks, or toilets
  • Rusty shower rod
  • Partially clogged sinks caused by aging pipes
  • Dirty or faded lamp or window shades

Tenant damages usually require more extensive repair, and at greater cost than “normal wear and tear”, and are often the result of a tenant’s abuse or negligence that is above and beyond normal wear and tear.

Tenant Damage

  • Gaping holes in walls or plaster
  • Drawings, crayon markings, or wallpaper that owner did not approve
  • Seriously damaged or ruined wallpaper
  • Chipped or gouged wood floors
  • Doors ripped off hinges
  • Broken windows
  • Missing fixtures
  • Holes in ceiling from removed fixtures
  • Holes, stains, or burns in carpet
  • Missing or cracked bathroom tiles
  • Chipped and broken enamel in bathtubs and sinks
  • Clogged or damaged toilet from improper use
  • Missing or bent shower rods
  • Torn, stained, or missing lamp and window shades



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